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Conflict Management in Higher Ed Report
printfriendlyVolume 3, Number 3, May 2003

My How We Have Grown:
CMHER Subscribers from
2000 – 2003

In the second issue of the Report (March/April 2000) we presented a profile of the Report’s Early Adopters. At that time there were 245 registered subscribers. Now, three years later, the Conflict Management in Higher Education Report has more than 800 such subscribers. The Report is freely available to non-subscribers, but those who have taken the time to register are provided with an announcement when new issues are posted. We thought it would be interesting to see how the subscriber base, our tried and true readership, has changed over the last three years.

When reviewing the data presented here, please be aware that not all subscribers choose to provide complete demographic information (it is optional), and the total number of people answering any question varies. In addition, some of the questions allowed people to provide more than one response so the total number of responses may be greater than the number of people who are registered subscribers to the Report.

In addition to a general overview of our subcribers, tables at the end of the article provide a review of the web traffic for the report from February 2002 to the present to shed some light on broader readership patterns. We changed web servers in early 2002, so we are basing these figures on traffic since the move.

What Roles Do Our Subscribers
Play on Campus?

While not all of our readers are based on campus, people working in higher education do comprise our target audience. We are thus quite happy to report that we have seen a substantial percentage increase in all our main target audiences of university/college students, faculty, and Conflict Resolution services staff. All of these groups have had at least a 240% increase (246, 281, and 456% respectively).

The table below shows the growth for each type of subscriber.

Formal Roles on Campus
 
May 2000
May 2003
Percentage Increase
Students (total) 54 187 246%
Undergraduate Students
14 48 242
Masters Students
25 89 256
Doctoral Students
15 50 233
Faculty (total) 60 229 281
Part-time Instructors
34 111 226
Assistant Professors
6 33 450
Associate Professors
11 35 218
Full Professors
7 45 543
Emeritus Faculty
2 5 150
Staff Members 18 100 456
Administrators 39 173 344
Ombudsman 29 49 67
Outside Consultants 23 68 196
Campus Security 2 2 0

 

With respect to the overall composition of our subscribers, analysis reveals it has not changed very much since 2000. The largest change was a reduction in the overall percentage of subscribers who are ombuspersons and an increase in the percentage of subscribers who are administrators (up from 17% to 21%). The pie chart shown below illustrates the composition of our current college and university-based subscribers with respect to their roles.

User Role

What Kind of Conflict Handling
Experience Have We Got?

With respect to experiences working with conflicts on campus, the Report subscribers are a broadly experienced lot. At the launch of the Report and still today, the top 5 types of experience are as follows:

  • Informal Mediators
  • Informal Problem Solvers
  • Formal Campus Mediators
  • Mediator Trainers
  • CR Skills Trainers

The table below presents all the various types of conflict handling experience listed by Report subscribers.

Campus Conflict Handling Experiences
(not all subscribers answered this question...)
  May 2000 May 2003
 
n=189
%
n=663
%
Participants in a Mediation 72 38.10% 183 27.60
Grievant/Appeals Board Users 24 12.70 48 7.24
Litigants 12 6.35 32 4.83
Collective Bargaining Team Members 12 6.35 42 6.33
Partnering Session Participants 13 6.88 27 4.07
Informal Problem Solvers 109 57.67 322 48.57
Ombuds 39 20.63 77 11.61
EEO Officers 9 4.76 51 7.69
Advocates 25 13.23 85 12.82
Informal Mediators 118 62.43 347 52.34
Formal Campus Mediators 86 45.50 281 42.38
Former High School or Middle School Mediators 5 2.65 20 3.02
Mediation Intake Workers 36 19.05 85 12.82
Coordinators of Campus Mediation Initiatives 48 25.40 110 16.59
Mediator Trainers 98 51.85 255 38.46
CR Skills Trainers 100 52.91 248 37.41
Faculty/Instructors for ADR Course 69 36.51 184 27.75
Conflict Researchers 32 16.93 140 21.12
Dispute Systems Work 57 30.16 80 12.07
Judicial Board Members 14 7.41 54 8.14
Appeals Board Members 15 7.94 52 7.84
Grievance Board Members 34 17.99 51 7.69
Administrators Addressing Conflict Internal to Their Area 29 15.34 169 25.49
Administrators Addressing Conflict External to Their Area 32 16.93 133 20.06
Sexual Harassment Officers 17 8.99 60 9.05
Other 22 11.64 91 13.73

What Kind of Schools Do Our Subscribers Come From?

As the chart below shows, in both 2000 and 2003 more of our subscribers come from large (>20,000) or small schools (1,001-5,000) than from medium sized schools.

What Kind of Professional Associations
are We Involved With?

Our readers are involved in the full spectrum of conflict resolution and higher education professional associations, as the table below reveals.

Membership in National Organizations
  May 2000 May 2003 Percentage Increase
ACCUO (Association of Canadian College and University Ombuds) 2 7 250%
ACR (Association for Conflict Resolution - merger of SPIDR, CRENet, AFM) 96 157 64
COPRED (Consortium on Peace Research, Education and Development 5 10 100
IACM (International Association for Conflict Management) 1 7 600
NAFCM (National Association for Community Mediation) 17 34 100
PSA (Peace Studies Association) 2 7 250
TOA (The Ombuds Association) 18 27 50
UCOA (University and College Ombuds Association) 32 43 34
AACU (Association of American Colleges and Universities) 1 7 600
AAHE (American Association for Higher Education) 4 27 575
ACPA (American College Personnel Association) 8 43 438
AERA (American Educational Research Association) 1 6 500
ASJA (Association for Student Judicial Affairs) 10 36 260
ASHE (Association for the Study of Higher Education) 2 3 50
NACUA (National Association of College and University Attorneys) 4 7 75
NASPA (National Association of Student Affairs Professionals) 10 47 370

 

 
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